Promotional Products Businesses Should Use

There’s no denying how effective promotional products can be for businesses at trade shows – and it doesn’t matter what industry you’re in either. Why? Because the products are designed to get your name and branding in front of people, to help them remember you when they’re in need of your product or service.

Nowadays there is such a wide range of promotional products available to give out at trade shows, so you’ll be able to find something that suits your target audience and your budget.

Let’s start with the classics…

The most obvious choice of promo product for a trade show would be pens. Because, let’s face it, everybody needs a pen. It’s small enough that anybody can grab one; they don’t even need a bag for it – they can just pop it in their pocket, if needs be.

One thing to remember when giving away pens is that it shouldn’t feel too cheap – while we all need pens, nobody wants a cheap one. But don’t worry… this doesn’t mean you’re going to have pay through the nose for every promotional pen you give away. You can actually buy great quality pens at a really affordable price.

Another option that’s small enough to fit in a pocket would be USBs/FlashDrives. It might not be something that’s used everyday by the person you give it to, but it’s highly likely to be sat on their desk at work, just in case they need one. Which means when they’re racking their brains trying to think of who to help with their problem, they’ll spot the USB and get in touch.

Another classic option is mugs – but gone are the days of only being able to choose a bog-standard mug… you can now pick from a wide range of styles so you’ll be able to find something out there that suits your target audience and helps to make you stand out.

Then you have options that are more likely to be used out and about, increasing your brand awareness even further. This includes things like bags, lanyards, umbrellas, oyster card holders, sports bottles, and keyrings.

If you know you’re going to have a stall at a trade show during the wet, winter months, umbrellas are a great option. Think about it… how many times have you left the house and completely forgotten your umbrella, only to get caught in a downpour? Now imagine if you were given a free umbrella at a trade show..? You’d be more likely to remember that company, wouldn’t you?

So not only are you in their mind, when that person uses the umbrella, they’re going to cross the path of potentially hundreds of people in a day. And if the it stands out for all the right reasons, you’ll be in the minds of that see it – all for the cost of an umbrella!

The same goes for oyster card holders – it’s something practical that they’ll potentially use every day, so they’re reminded of your company on a daily basis, it fits in their pocket, and it will be seen by plenty of other people during their commute.

You can even look at watches as a possible option too. These are fantastic at really making sure your business stays at the forefront of your prospects mind. After all, how many companies do you know that give away a free watch at trade shows?

It’s a great way to make sure you stand out amongst all of the other stands there that day… and you’ll become a name that people see on a regular basis as they check the time. So to the end user, it’s an incredibly luxurious product to be given for free by a company that doesn’t really know them but for you, it’s an incredibly cost-effective way to increase your brand awareness on a wider scale – especially if you buy in bulk, as this really keeps the costs down.

And if you want to make sure everyone in the office is reminded of you on a regular basis, you can go for more practical items such as coasters, computer mice, mouse mats, folders, or even clocks!

There really is a great range of promotional products available nowadays, so if you’re struggling to decide which option works best for you, start thinking about what your target audience are most likely to use and what’s going to make you stand out.

Items such as USBs, umbrellas, and watches are great because they’re incredibly cost-effective items that are practical for the end user – plus they’re unlikely to be given out by other people at the trade show. Just because most people stick to pens, lanyards, and mugs doesn’t mean you have to!

Melisa Greenfield, October 2016

Melisa Greenfield is an experienced copywriter who’s been working in the promotional industry for 2 years, helping to promote the benefits of using promotional products to increase brand awareness.

7 Golden Rules for Picking Great Promotional Products

7 Golden Rules for Picking Great Promotional Products

Everyday customers old and new reach out to BONGO to get sound advice on what promotional products they should use for their business. But what makes a great promotional product? With 1000’s of lines available online, it can be daunting to get to grips with the options!

To help you, here are 7 golden rules for picking great promotional products:

QUALITY
Quality is the key.  If a quality and useful promotional product is received by your client – they will certainly remember you.

DESIRABILITY
This is especially important to get right as gifting potential leads an item that isn’t desirable, may reflect your company in the same light: a desirable item denotes a company of quality!

USABILITY
Understand that usability key! Statistics show that 90.4% of people report currently owning or possessing a promotional product received in the last 24 months so it stands to reason that the most useful the item is, the more likely it is that your promotional product will stick around, day in, day out.

RELEVANCE
Understand that relevance is a big factor – and every sector is different. A branded lip balm for a Lawyer’s conference – is that the best fit? Would that gift be relevant and well received by those potential leads? Probably not. Understand your target audience and pick the most desirable items for the people you want to want to reach out to.

CREATIVITY
Use promotional products to make a lasting statement about who your company are, and what you offer. Take time to think of a creative idea that ties in with your brand marketing strategy – what special service do you offer? What goods can you deliver? Don’t be afraid to think outside the box – be fun! Are you a dentist? Why not send out some sugar-free sweets in a playful way? Trying to recruit people to sign up to your gym? Why not gift them a free water bottle so that you’re always on their desk, reminding them to get in touch and get fit – the possibilities are endless!

INTRIGUING
Try and see your product to introduce a bit of curiosity with your potential customers, we can help you with plenty of inspiration! For example, is a client a PR company? Why not send a branded pen with an inscription – ‘What could we write for you?’. Be playful, think outside the box. What would intrigue you to make that enquiry?

GOOD VALUE
However great all the other rules – just remember what would be best associated with your brand: VALUE.

Digital Printing Technology

Digital Printing Technology

How Digital Printing Technology is taking us closer to fully customizable clothing. The future of fashion, according to Epson, is all about customization. From the prints and colors we choose to wear, to indeed the size and shape that best suits us.
Tie together digital printing, a bit of artificial intelligence and some robotics on the end, and it’s a vision that’s not too far off, which is precisely what the technology company is hoping to help make possible on all accounts.
Its senior team, including global president Minoru Usui, was in New York last week to host its third annual “Digital Couture” event. This saw 13 design teams from across North and Latin America leveraging Epson’s dye-sublimation and direct-to-fabric printing technology to create small collections that were presented during an evening event held ahead of New York Fashion Week. The occasion also served to officially introduce the fact Epson acquired Italian textile printer manufacturer Robustelli in 2016.
“This event is an opportunity to underscore Epson’s commitment to the industry, and to showcase the increasing impact of digital technologies on innovation in the world of fashion,” says Usui. “Working with [Robustelli], Epson has helped drive the shift to digital by some of the leading fashion houses who value the quality, throughput and high cost performance we bring to their unique creations.

While digital printing itself isn’t a new concept – Epson already works with numerous leading fashion brands it can’t name, as well as the likes of Under Armour and Adidas – it’s undergoing a period of rapid adoption today, Usui explains. He refers to the idea of being “one third of the way up the digital mountain.” In fact, the market for worldwide digital textile printing is expected to grow annually at almost 25% until 2019, according to WTiN Intelligence.
Part of the reason for that increased uptake comes down to market forces. In the first instance, the fashion industry is going through an evolution (revolution even) in terms of how it gets product from the runway during fashion week to stores and ultimately customers’ wardrobes, quicker than ever.
Focused on a strategy coined “see-now, buy-now”, this is about responding to the gap that lies between fashion shows that have become heavily consumer facing in the digital and social media era, and the point of delivery typically some 6 months later. In short, consumers want to be able to “see” the garments now and indeed “buy” them right away. Designers inevitably want to not only capitalize on that buzz and negate the current fatigue they’re seeing shoppers otherwise have, but also increase the barriers for fast fashion brands to play copycat.
That motivation and momentum means a serious shift in the production timeline however. Unique prints on textiles are just one part of the pie, but a significant one. It currently takes anywhere from two to three months for traditional screen-printing. Digital printing by comparison can happen immediately.

Other benefits include the fact digital printing ensures higher quality, more unique designs at scale, greater variety of rich colors and more. It’s literally possible to take a picture on your iPhone today and print it onto a textile at photo-realistic quality straight away.
The cost performance for small production runs also means looks can be created on a scale of one – rather than thousands. That means personalized designs for individual customers on-demand on the one hand, as well as an ability to print “just in time” – so when the demand is there, rather than stockpiling and ultimately creating waste – on the other.
“The cost to produce one or thousands is the same, it doesn’t make a difference at all,” explains Timothy Check, product manager of Professional Imaging at Epson. The equipment itself can either be scaled to multiple machines for mass production, or just be done on one small, relatively affordable, one. His view is on the flexibility this affords designers and retailers to also change and adapt strategy based on which pieces perform well in the market, or update looks for new seasons at ease.
“People want something different these days, they want something that stands out,” he says. “We’re working with a lot of manufacturers who say they’re not doing 20,000 of the same garment anymore, but just doing 500 of them. Then they’ll do another 500, but in a slightly different color perhaps. They’re doing more things of smaller quantities. Digital enables a producer to be able to do that efficiently. The traditional method by comparison is not possible to do cost effectively.

This is especially relevant to think about for the millennial generation, 48% of which expect brands to customize offers these days to suit their needs, according to American Express. That refers to everything from pricing to messaging, but product is becoming an ever-present part.
“The pattern of [the fashion industry] is to produce at high volume and sell high volume, so we have to convince people to move away from that model into a customized one,” Usui explains, in relation to the biggest barrier for digital printing’s broader uptake. “That’s why an event like this is good for us – we can bring young designers together to think about this and show what’s possible – show how to shift this business into the digital era.” Earlier on the same day, Epson held a Fashion & Technology Forum featuring speakers from PVH, For.Tex, Elie Tahari and more, discussing the same subject. Designer Erin Fetherston, who already uses digital printing, noted customization, or certainly originality, as one of the industry’s most pressing needs: “The biggest challenge for a brand my size is seeing consumers wanting more and more uniqueness… That is the opposite to how you would have strategized your production a few years ago.” She added: “With see-now, buy-now, when that becomes the norm, then we have to work backwards in our process and figure out how we do things faster. That’s when technology becomes our greatest aid.

Of course being able to print customized, made-to-order textiles at high speed still leaves a further gap around the rest of the production process, which is where Epson believes further technological innovation can step in. Artificial intelligence will increasingly play a role in sizing solutions for instance, while robotics will be what helps with cut-and-sew. “Epson has a very considerable and growing robotics business and we would like to leverage that business in this industry in the future to help designers create very industrialized designs,” Usui adds.

Speaking at the forum, Barry McGeough, group vice president of PVH Innovation Next, noted how important this will be for a “local for local” (local manufacturing for local sales) strategy in the future. This is both about speed to market and more sustainable processes, he explained. “To do that, we are going to have to make sure we have robotics; a lot of automated processes that can move these things really quickly. It’s about lead time optimization.” He referenced Sewbo, a Seattle-based business that has created the first industrial robot able to sew together a t-shirt. While for designers like Fetherston, where a heavy level of handmade, delicate work is core to the collection, that might seem an unlikely solution, but the longterm possibilities are evidently there. For now, the digitization of textile printing is inevitably and already well on its way.

Rachel Arthur is a business journalist, innovation consultant and the founder and editor of Fashion & Mash, a daily news site covering the intersection of fashion and technology.

Promo Is Not for Me!

Promo is not for me!

The client is always right…right? Well sometimes….. always…
We’re sure that on occasions, potential clients may say, ‘Promo? Nah, I don’t need promo’.

However, as an industry, we know differently. Here’s what we came up with…

Beautiful young girl with glowing colorful disco make-up and curly hairstyle

I don’t need promo because…
I like to blow our money on big spend marketing and even bigger hair.

This glitzy, shoulder padded, glamorous marketer thinks spending big is impressive. She likes to spend more than she needs to get her message across: she loves commercial radio (5.8 cents per impression), magazine ads (4.5 cents per impression), and TV (1.8 cents per impression). Why would she love tangible product marketing when it comes in at only 0.5 cent per impression? She’s impressed by the wine list at the long lunch, not by marketing effectiveness.

 

We don't need promo because

We don’t need promo because…
We’re blood-suckers: you can only take a customer once, right?

These guys see people as walking wallets and use any means to separate the customer from their cash. Their motto is ‘there are plenty of fish in the sea’, so there is no need to show customers you appreciate them. That is why, with 64% of marketers rating promo as the channel most able to make a person feel appreciated, tangible product marketing is not for these guys. They prefer to stick with flat media like print and digital and avoid building any kind of customer connection at all.

 

Charisma personified

I don’t need promo because…
With all this charisma, all I need is a video on You Tube and people just chuck money at me!

It’s hard to argue with sheer animal magnetism to drive a cause. This all-knowing marketer has it all, so he can scoff at his peers who have to work hard to drive loyalty. He knows that tangible product marketing is the best channel for invoking loyalty to causes or events (59%) – he just doesn’t need the help. (and girls – he’s single!).

 

Beautiful young woman doing manicure in the office

I don’t need promo because…
If my customers respond to my marketing, I’ll have to work harder

We all know how much easier it would be without those pesky customers. This marketer has it all worked out. She can impress her boss with flashy, high-profile campaigns and by using buzzwords, charts and spreadsheets, all the while avoiding the channel that is most effective in getting customers to take action – yes, you guessed it – tangible product marketing! Rated by 51% of marketers as the best channel at being able to get a person to take action, it kills TV at 19%, digital 11%, online 10% and print 9%. But those channels do let her chill on a Friday…

 

Power is in his hands. Smiling senior man in shirt and suspenders sitting at the table and smoking cigar while lots of money laying near him

We don’t need promo because…
The business is a front for the MOB

Understandably, if like one Mr Soprano, you want to fly under the radar and don’t want customers recalling your name, then you don’t want promo. The problem with tangible product marketing is the way it fosters brand recall and awareness, with 61% of marketers rating it as the best channel for constant message reinforcement compared to 15% for TV, 10% for print, 8% for digital and 6% for direct mail. See, too many witnesses.

Of course you need promo! In the real world, tangible product marketing if spend efficiently, creates positive brand perceptions, recall and results.

The statistics quoted in this article are from research conducted by BPMA and ASI.

 

Targeted Promotional Campaigns

Targeted Campaignsmastercard

Targeted Promotional Campaigns not only create better connections, they can even help redefine a brand or open up new markets. Research conducted by APPA shows that the current generation of consumers appreciates promotional products more than any generation before. This is because they offer a tangible value-add to their purchasing experience. A message passes from the brand to the consumer that says: “We are rewarding your brand loyalty. Thank you!”

Recent research supports this:

  • 75 percent of human resource managers surveyed are using promotional products in recognition programmes
  • 72 percent of marketing and HR managers say promotional products are very effective in motivation and retention of staff
  • 100 percent of advertisers said adding a promotional product returned a favourable response to their campaign
  • 69 percent of advertisers said promotional products increased brand interest
  • 84 percent of advertisers said promotional products created more favourable impressions

A critical part of making an advertising campaign is determining a campaign theme as it sets the tone for the individual advertisements and other forms of marketing communications that will be used. The campaign theme is the central message that will be communicated in the promotional activities. The campaign themes are usually developed with the intention of being used for a substantial period but many of them are short-lived due to factors such as being ineffective or market conditions and / or competition in the marketplace and marketing mix.Targeted Advertising Campaigns are developed to achieve a particular goal or a set of goals. Such goals typically include establishing a brand, raising brand awareness, increasing the rate of conversions/sales. The degree of success or failure at reaching these goals is measured with analytic tools.

Promotional Products – Then and Now

Bongo Promotional Products

Promotional Products – Then and Now

Promotional merchandise, promotional items, promotional products, promotional gifts, or advertising gifts, sometimes nicknamed swag or schwag, are articles of merchandise (often branded with a logo) used in marketing and communication programs. They are given away to promote a company, corporate image, brand, or event. These items are usually imprinted with a company’s name, logo or slogan, and given away at trade shows, conferences, and as part of guerrilla marketing campaigns. The first known promotional products in the United States are commemorative buttons dating back to the election of George Washington in 1789. During the early 19th century, there were some advertising calendars, rulers, and wooden specialties, but there wasn’t an organized industry for the creation and distribution of promotional items until later in the 19th century.

Jasper Meeks, a printer in Coshocton, Ohio, is considered by many to be the originator of the industry when he convinced a local shoe store to supply book bags imprinted with the store name to local schools. Henry Beach, another Coshocton printer and a competitor of Meeks, picked up on the idea, and soon the two men were selling and printing bags for marbles, buggy whips, card cases, fans, calendars, cloth caps, aprons, and even hats for horses. In 1904, 12 manufacturers of promotional items got together to found the first trade association for the industry.

That organization is now known as the Promotional Products Association International or PPAI, which currently has more than 10,000 global members. PPAI represents the promotional products industry of more than 22,000 distributors and approximately 4,800 manufacturers. The UK & Ireland promotional merchandise industry formally emerged as corporate marketing became more sophisticated during the late 1950s. Before this companies may have provided occasional gifts, but there was no recognised promotional merchandise industry.

The real explosion in the growth of the promotional merchandise industry took place in the 1970s. At this time an ever increasing number of corporate companies recognised the benefits gained from promoting their corporate identity, brand or product, with the use of gifts featuring their own logo. In the early years the range of products available were limited; however, in the early 1980s demand grew from distributors for a generic promotional product catalogue they could brand as their own and then leave with their corporate customers. In later years these catalogues could be over-branded to reflect a distributor’s corporate image and distributors could then give them to their end user customers as their own. In the early years promotional merchandise catalogues were very much sales tools and customers would buy the products offered on the pages.

In the 1990s new catalogue services emerged for distributors from various sources. In the nineties there was also the creation of ‘Catalogue Groups’ who offered a unique catalogue to a limited geographical group of promotional merchandise distributor companies. Membership of a Catalogue Group could also offer improved buying terms, a network of fellow distributor companies, & provide other support services. A catalogue group offers discounted products to a select group of distributors who have all been in the industry for over three years. Members of the this group have regional exclusivity as one of their perks. Up until the 1990s the industry had a peak season in which the majority of promotional products were sold. The season featured around Christmas & the giving of gifts. This changed significantly in the early 1990s as Christmas gifts became less appropriate in a multicultural Britain. Corporate companies were also becoming more inventive in their marketing and were now using promotional merchandise throughout the year to support the promotion of brands, products & events. In the early 21st century the role of a promotional merchandise catalogue started to change, as it could no longer fully represent the vast range of products in the market place. By 2007 catalogues were being mailed to targeted customer lists, rather than the blanket postal mailings that had taken place before. The catalogue had now become seen more as a ‘business card’ demonstrating the concept of what a company did, rather than a critical sales tool. In 2009 published results from research involving a representative group of distributor companies, which indicated the usage of hard copy catalogues was expected to fall up to 25% in 2010.

Distributor companies are experts in sourcing creative promotional products. Traditionally, to ensure that they had an effective manufacturer network, they kept themselves aware of the trade product ranges available by attending exhibitions across the world (namely the Trade Only National Show in the UK, PSI in Europe and the PPAI Show in Las Vegas, NV) & from mailings received from manufacturers themselves. In 2004 the way the trade sourced promotional products began to change with the launch an online trade sourcing service which united distributors with manufacturers worldwide. This service is purely for vetted trade promotional merchandise distributor companies & is not available to corporate end user companies. By 2008 almost every distributor had a website demonstrating a range of available promotional products. Very few offer the ability to order products online mainly due to the complexities surrounding the processes to brand the promotional products required. Sourcing Promotional merchandise is, in the main, purchased by corporate companies in USA, Canada, the UK & Ireland through promotional merchandise distributor companies. In the United States and Canada, these distributors are called “Promotional Consultants” or “promotional product distributors.”

Distributors have the ability to source & supply tens of thousands of products from across the globe. Even with the advent and growth of the Internet this supply chain has not changed, for a few reasons: Promotional products by definition are custom printed with a logo, company name or message usually in specific PMS colors. Distributors help end-users gather artwork in the correct format and in some cases, distributors might create artwork for end-users. Distributors then interface with manufacturers, printers or suppliers, forwarding artwork in the correct format and correct size for the job. Since good distributors are well aware of several manufacturers’ capabilities, they can save an end-user time and money searching for a printer or manufacturer who can produce and ship the end-user’s products on time, on specification and in the required quantities. Many distributors operate on the internet and/or in person. Many suppliers wish not to invest in the staffing to service end-users’ needs, which is the purpose of merchandise distributor companies.

Products and Promotional merchandise is used globally to promote brands, products, and corporate identity. They are also used as giveaways at events, such as exhibitions and product launches. Promotional products can be used for non-profit organizations to promote their cause, as well as promote certain events that they hold, such as walks or any other event that raises money for a cause. Almost anything can be branded with a company’s name or logo and used for promotion. Common items include t-shirts, caps, keychains, posters, bumper stickers, pens, mugs, or mouse pads. The largest product category for promotional products is wearable items, which make up more than 30% of the total. Eco-friendly promotional products such as those created from recycled materials and bamboo, a renewable resource, are also experiencing a significant surge in popularity. Most promotional items are relatively small and inexpensive, but can range to higher-end items; for example celebrities at film festivals and award shows are often given expensive promotional items such as expensive perfumes, leather goods, and electronics items. Companies that provide expensive gifts for celebrity attendees often ask that the celebrities allow a photo to be taken of them with the gift item, which can be used by the company for promotional purposes.

Other companies provide luxury gifts such as handbags or scarves to celebrity attendees in the hopes that the celebrities will wear these items in public, thus garnering publicity for the company’s brand name and product. Brand awareness is the most common use for promotional items. Other objectives that marketers use promotional items to facilitate include employee relations and events, tradeshow traffic-building, public relations, new customer generation, dealer and distributor programs, new product introductions, employee service awards, not-for-profit programs, internal incentive programs, safety education, customer referrals, and marketing research. Promotional items are also used in politics to promote candidates and causes. Promotional items as a tool for non-commercial organizations, such as schools and charities are often used as a part of fund raising and awareness-raising campaigns.

A prominent example was the livestrong wristband, used to promote cancer awareness and raise funds to support cancer survivorship programs and research. Collecting certain types of promotional items is also a popular hobby. In particular, branded antique point of sale items that convey a sense of nostalgia are popular with collectors and are a substantial component to the antique industry. The giving of corporate gifts vary across international borders and cultures, with the type of product given often varying from country to country. Promotional merchandise is rarely bought directly by corporate companies from the actual manufacturers of the promotional products. A manufacturer’s expertise lies in the physical production of the products, but getting a product in front of potential customers is a completely different skill set and a complex process.

Within the UK & Ireland promotional merchandise industry a comprehensive network of promotional merchandise distributor companies exist. A promotional merchandise distributor is defined as a company who “has a dedicated focus to the sale of promotional merchandise to end users”. (An ‘end user’ is a corporate company or organisation that purchases promotional merchandise for their own use.) These distributor companies have the expertise to not only take the product to market, but are also to provide the expert support required. The unique aspect of promotional merchandise is that on most occasions the product is printed with the logo, or brand, of a corporate organisation.

The actual manufacturers rarely have the set up to actually print the item. Promotional merchandise distributor companies are expert in artwork and printing processes. In addition to this the promotional merchandise distributors also provide full support in processing orders, artwork, proofing, progress chasing & delivery of promotional products from multiple manufacturing sources. Trade associations In the UK, the industry has two main trade bodies, Promota (Promotional Merchandise Trade Association) founded in 1958, and the BPMA (British Promotional Merchandise Association) established in 1965. These trade associations represent the industry and provide services to both manufacturers & distributors of promotional merchandise. In the United States, PPAI (the Promotional Products Association International) is the not for profit association, offering the industry’s largest tradeshow (The PPAI Expo), as well as training, online member resources, and legal advocacy.

Colour and Emotion in Promotional Advertising

colour emotion guide

Colour and Emotion in Promotional Advertising

Colour and Emotion in Promotional Advertising affects us all. Every colour creates an emotional reaction in people. In design and in choosing promotional products we use colour to help guide emotion and give people an immediate feeling the first time they interact with something. In the design world, colours are purposely selected to meet a bigger goal. What is it that are we trying to say about a company, a product or a brand? Certain colours can attract attention and can convey the feeling of the company and it’s branding without even having to say a word. Examples are McDonalds, Nike, Apple, Microsoft – just a few of the companies that don’t need words – just icons and colours.

These are the common patterns with regard to colours and emotions that have been identified as to how people perceive colours and what impact this has when customers are purchasing products. There’s no doubt that colours have a big impact on the end result – so next time you are purchasing your promotional product it would wise to think about what product colour would be best to truly represent your company or brand in the most accurate and appealing way.

Examples of colour meanings:-

  • RED * energetic, attention-grabbing, exciting and aggressive
  • YELLOW * cheerful, friendly, positive and energetic
  • ORANGE * fun, playful, childlike, happy, energetic, modern
  • BLUE * reliable, secure, trustworthy
  • GREEN * trustworthy, refreshing, restful, soothing
  • BROWN * stable, secure, durable
  • BEIGE * durable, classic, neutral
  • BURGUNDY * elegant, expensive
  • PINK * romantic, soft, tender
  • PURPLE * mysterious, sensual, regal
  • LAVENDER * nostaligic, delicate
  • GREY * classic, timeless, soothing
  • WHITE * innocent, simple, clean, sterile
  • BLACK * classic, elegant, serious, bold, powerful

Good advice to keep in mind when consideration your next range of promotional products.

Promotional Drink Bottles

drink bottles                  Quality Service Reliability Guarantee

Printed promotional drink bottles are very popular in the promotional market for several good reasons. Quite simply, they are genuinely useful and extremely popular. They look great printed or engraved and offer great logo visibility as the products are well used, often both in the office, in the car, sports events, and outdoor and sporting activities. Printed drink bottles are also very durable which obviously means that your logo will be seen for longer – they don’t run out of batteries or break down and are made of durable materials. They are an environmentally friendly alternative to disposable plastic  water bottles – and of course, all of our drink bottles are BPA free. We offer a great variety of styles from light weight plastic sports bottles to high quality durable stainless steel to. Our drink bottles are also available in a variety of  price points so you are sure to find one that suits your tastes and budget.

So where price, longevity of impact and high logo visibility are important to your promotional campaign it is hard to go past the promotional drink bottle. Next time your staff, customer or whomever the lucky recipient of your next promotional travel mug is, reaches for a drink bottle to take to the sports field, to gym, to their office or anywhere else they need to drink (everywhere) it’s your logo they and everyone else will see and your company they will all be thinking of. Promotional drink bottles are great way of taking your promotional dollar further.

Automotive Promotional Products

car-sunshades1-300x300                     shutterstock3

 

 

With people these days spending so much time in their cars, it is no wonder that products associated with cars make brilliant automotive promotional products. From key rings to outdoor products your clients will thank you every time they reach for that umbrella, or for that travel mug with your logo. Choose well and they will associate your logo with that wonderful picnic they had with their family… with their time laying under that beach umbrella… or with the first aid kit that was there when they needed it. Whatever it is, your logo could be there when it matters most. Check out a vast range of car related promotional products.

The interior of a closed car parked in a non-shaded spot exposed to extensive sunlight can sustain sun and heat damage. Sunlight passing through the car’s windshield produces the greenhouse effect, heating the interior to a temperature much higher than the outside air. Excessive heat and prolonged exposure to direct sunlight can make the dashboard fade and eventually crack, cause seat upholstery discoloration and aging, etc.

The windshield glass itself blocks most of the UV light and some of the infrared radiation. But it can’t protect from the visible light that mostly penetrates through it and gets absorbed by the objects inside the car. The visible light that passes into the interior through the windshield is converted into the infrared light which, in its turn, is blocked by the glass and gets trapped inside, heating up the interior. Windshield sun shades have a reflective surface to bounce the light back, reducing the interior temperature.

Stencil Range of Clothing

 

Stencil-distributor                       shutterstock3

Check out the latest range of Stencil polo shirts, t-shirts, business shirts and jackets.

The Stencil range of clothing has been bringing innovative new designs and fabrics into the Australian corporate, promotional, uniform and sportswear market. Stencil is best known for their high-quality, high-concept fabrics such as a yarn-woven Cool-Dry®, liquid-repelling Nano-Gear®, the vibrant and super-comfortable Solar-Lite® and their most recent addition, Bio-Weave®, a silky blend of plant cellulose and Cool-Dry® yarn.

Stencil’s product range spans from distinctively styled polos and t-shirts for both men and women to business shirts, cold-weather clothing (including fleeces and jackets) and custom orders. Though Stencil is constantly working on creating and refining their new fabric technologies for each season, Stencil also appreciate the value of more traditional fabrics, from soft cottons to poly/cotton waffles. By understanding the intrinsic values of different materials, Stencil is able to match the ideal characteristics for a given item of clothing to the most appropriate fabric or blend.

Stencil carries a full stock service on all of their product lines with the promise of fast & professional service. Stencil trusts that their range will help you and your label stand out from the crowd.

Customised Car Air Fresheners

AIR FRESHENERS

Check out our custom made promotional air fresheners.

Our customised car air fresheners are  Air Fresheners that are made from absorbent cotton paper. Showcase your brand with these attractive advertising incentives. Air Fresheners are a great way to let your customers advertise your company details or product. The standard size is 80mm x 80mm and your design can be cut to shape within that area.  We can also custom make to any size with full colour printing on both sides.  The hanging accessory can be a white or black string or a plastic hook.  Custom printed packaging is available with full colour printing.

  • minimum order is 500 units
  • 45 fragrances to choose from
  • production timing on this product is around 3-4 weeks

Air fresheners are consumer products used in homes and cars emitting fragrances. Air freshening is not only limited to modern day sprays, air freshening also can involve the use of organic and everyday house hold items. Although air freshener is primarily used for odor elimination some people simply use air freshener for the pleasant odors they emit.

Fragrances available are:  banana, green apple, pineapple, christmas tree, jasmine, tulip, cooler water, ocean, honey, blueberry, honey peach, starfruit, chrysanthemum, pine, violet, forest, bubblegum, milk, cherry, lemon, strawberry, cinnamon, mint, Chanel fragrance, forest berry, coffee, milk tea, citrus, mango, watermelon, lavender, rose, Chanel No. 5, nature, ginger, red wine, coconut, papaya, carnation, lily , sunflower, cologne fragrance, new car fragrance, green tea and sweet down.  If the fragrance you require is not in this list, please contact us.

You Get What You Pay For

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You Get What You Pay For

One of the most important issues to consider when buying promotional products – is safety.  Companies can waste thousands of dollars in choosing the wrong promotional product that can result in product recalls and negative media coverage – which can diminish the brand itself. Thus the term  ‘you get what you pay for’.

Promotional Products have consistently shown they are affordable, accountable and measurable advertising in rough economic times.  Lately more inexperienced and unethical players have entered the promotional products industry – with a lot of  promotional websites trying to convince unsuspecting consumersr that they have found the ‘direct’ connection to products, but in most instances that is the farthest thing from the truth – and the invisibility of the web isn’t the only problem.

30% of the promotional companies who claim to sell promotional products are Promotional Products Association industry members.   These industry members generate more than 80 per cent of the $2.02 billion spend in Australia.  In direct contrast, 90 per cent of the complaints received by Promotional Products Associations are against companies that are not members of these organizations.  Many of these  non members are repeat offenders, who market themselves extensively and focus on new, unsuspecting customers (as repeat business is unlikely).  The major reason consumers take the change is, overwhelmingly, PRICE.

Promotional products are an advertising medium the power of which some marketers are only just beginning to grasp – promotional products are not a commodity.  Latest research shows that the next generation of consumers are motivated and enticed by tangible forms of advertising.  In the early days, there were basic gift-with-purchase successes like the Coca Cola Yo Yos.  Now, promotional product campaigns are a part of every savvy marketers integrated solution.

Promotional Products today are used as complex triggers and data collection tools.  Product selection is no longer based on ego driven decisions by marketers, but are strategically chosen by online focus groups.  Since the 1970’s the promotional products industry has been growing and maturing.  Being aware of what questions to ask when producing Promotional Items and the creativity to integrate concepts linked to products are only a couple of the reasons why promotional product professionals are the perfect outsourced extension of most marketing departments.

Safety and health requirements, ILS (International Labour Standards) and technical branding application knowledge can make all the difference between a promotional success and a promotional nightmare.

There are questions marketers should be asking to ensure their next promotional experience is sucessful.  Some things in life are black and white.

QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR PROMOTIONAL PRODUCTS COMPANY…..

  1. How long have they been in the promotions business?
  2. Are they members of a Promotional Products Assocation?
  3. What is their policy on return of products?
  4. What is their policy on timely delivery of goods?
  5. What is their policy on quantity-short product deliveries?
  6. Are they able to offer your references on their previous supply experiences?

THINGS YOUR PROMOTIONAL PRODUCTS SUPPLIER NEEDS TO KNOW….

  1. The objectives and the audience that you want to reach with your promotion (e.g. rewarding consumers, increasing sales, acknowledging external business partners or internal staff, or to brand or increase attendance at an event)
  2. The response you want from the recipients of these products
  3. The information about your brand that you want to communicate
  4. The information or statistics from the recipients that you would find useful, if you were able to obtain it
  5. Historically, some of the other promotions done by your company, and
  6. What you would like the recipients to think about your company after the promotion is finished?

WHAT YOU SHOULD NOT HEAR FROM A PROMOTIONAL PRODUCTS COMPANY…..

  1. That they will undercut any price from any other promotional company
  2. That there is no guarantee on their product once you have received it
  3. That there is no need to sign off on artwork approvals